Erectile dysfunction – Is there hope?

    My wife and I have been married for over 40 years and we are both in our sixties. We have had a very active sex life. However over the last two years, we have been suffering from erectile dysfunction (ED) (I am including my wife because it also adversely affects her.)

    Here is some additional background. I have the following medical conditions:
    1. Sleep apnea – controlled with a CPAP for the last 15 years.
    2. Hypertension – controlled with medications, some of which have been known to be implicated with ED.
    3. Overweight – Yes, I know that losing weight could help.
    4. Pre-diabetic – the blood tests show that my blood sugar levels is slightly above normal range, and yes, maybe losing some weight and exercising more could possibly reverse it.
    5. Testosterone level – 10 years ago, a blood test showed that I was on the low end what is considered “normal”, whatever that means.

    I think that many men in the past who have suffered from this, don’t talk about it and just suck it up. They accept it as something that comes with old age. I am not ready to give up.

    Okay, my questions are “Is there hope for a reversal of my condition?” and “What should I pursue with my doctor?”

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    24 Answer(s)

      UPDATE:

      I have lost 35 pounds and things are feeling much better, not perfect mind you, but better.  My knee pain is almost gone, and my back pain is much reduced.  And my doctor has reduced one of my hypertension meds because my bp was too low under the original dosages.

      So things are looking up in this department.  It remains to be seen how this translate into the ED issue.

      Twin bed Answered on August 20, 2020.
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        That sounds really positive. Improving the knee and back pain will make it easier to exercise, and reducing the medication will probably help.

        I’m guessing that you feel more confident in your body, and your wife finds you more attractive which should also help with the ED

        On the floor Answered on August 20, 2020.
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          I personally believe that a great place for you to start would be a bhrt doctor. It sounds to me like low testosterone is definitely a contributing factor, if not the main factor. Defy Medical is telemedicine and we have had a great experience with them.

          Under the stars Answered on July 12, 2020.
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            I hope you get good answers…

            Under the stars Answered on July 12, 2020.
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              <SeekingChange> You could be right.  I understand that low testosterone can be a factor in weight gain.  I have gained a lot of weight in the past 10-15 years, and yes lifestyle changes can help also

              Twin bed Answered on July 12, 2020.
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                Don’t give up! Start with your family physician and possibly consider a referral to a urologist. Being your age, my thots and prayers are with you and your wife.

                California King Answered on July 12, 2020.
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                  Speaking from our personal experience…..

                  Low testosterone can negatively affect, or the opposite of it and having your optimal T levels can positively affect, all those extra issues as well.  My husband’s glucose was borderline diabetic (100) when he started, after being on TRT for 90 days, it dropped well into normal (upper-70s) with ZERO other changes in his diet or lifestyle.  He also leaned out and gained muscle… which he was exercising and weightlifting before and after, but he didn’t make any changes in his normal routine of exercise.  By increasing your muscle index and decreasing the fat index affects your life expectancy.  There’s a positive impact on your cholesterol and your heart.   And this isn’t mentioning the positive mental, emotional (many suffer from depression or lack of motivation) and sexual changes.

                  @Oldtimer, just be aware, there’s a high likelihood if you go to any regular physician other than someone who really knows hormones (a bhrt doctor), you will not get correct information, correct tests, correct interpretation of blood results, or even up to date information or scientific data on hormones.  Just speaking from personal experience, and hearing other’s testimonies, first, it would be good for you to be well educated on TRT (excelmale’s website is a good source of information) so that you can determine if your doctor is “in the know” on what he is dealing with or talking about (I was amazed at how ignorant the doctor’s we visited were, one was a GP and the other a urologist), and secondly, you can skip a lot of frustration and save a lot of time and money by just going directly to someone who knows hormones.  The con to bhrt doctor’s, they typically won’t take insurance.  Defy Medical does free consultations, it wouldn’t hurt setting one up and sharing everything you shared here, and see if they believe they can help you or if you need to work on other health issues first.

                  Under the stars Answered on July 12, 2020.
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                    Just got back from my initial visit with my doctor about this issue. We went over my history and talk about how to proceed. He ordered a blood test which will consist of a full panel  as well as testosterone and PSA tests.

                    He was not that concerned with my hypertension meds just yet. He thought I should get the testosterone test first, and go from there.  I have already lost 20 pounds since January and am feeling better overall. He thought that after figuring out what my T-level is and losing some more weight would be a good path to take before tackling the hypertension meds.

                    He suggested going to take the test about 8 or 9 AM would be the best because the T level is generally the highest at that time of day.

                    My question now is “what should a good t-level be?”  I did a little research and things look confusing to me.

                    Twin bed Answered on July 21, 2020.
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                      UPDATE:
                      Just got off the phone with my GP. We discussed my blood tests from earlier this week. My T-level was 583, which is surprising because it was in the 200’s about 10 years ago. My glucose level was 121 which indicates that I am pre-diabetic.

                      He suggested that we use Viagra (I am including my wife because she wants to be involved, and considers it to be her problem too. Kind of like a man thinking about pregnancy as an “us” thing, I know I did.) We are anxious to try it out, to see how things go.

                      Losing more weight could possibly help (at least 70 more pounds to go). I read something on line which stated a study showed that about 30 % of men with obesity who lost significant weight regained their erectile function. Losing the weight could also help with my health in the long run, especially with my bad back, stamina, hypertension, and pre-diabetes.

                      My GP also suggested that I could have a circulation problem which could be looked into at a future time.

                      As a side, four years ago I had a malignancy on one of my kidneys for which a surgeon removed part of the kidney. I had an MRI earlier this week, and it came back clean. My wife and I are going to celebrate tonight. I love my sweetheart of 41 years so much…..

                      Twin bed Answered on July 24, 2020.

                      Thanks for the update!

                      on July 24, 2020.

                      Enjoy celebrating!   If you continue to not feel at your optimum, really consider going to a bhrt doctor.  Your numbers would be low for many men to feel their best.    I hope your experience with Viagra is good.  I know that my husband couldn’t handle the side effects, and that was something that pushed him to make the leap into TRT.

                      on July 24, 2020.

                      I still think that my T Level could be an issue, but since the t-level is above 500, I would like to rule out as much as possible other issues first.

                      on July 24, 2020.
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                        Nothing wrong with taking some Viagra if that is what you need. Hormones can be complicated for sure and a few men do need help in the area, but I don’t think many. I do if you have a hormone problem, a regular doctor is not that good with dealing with it.  You need a specialist. Women’s hormones need help sometimes too.

                        On the floor Answered on July 27, 2020.
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